Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10266/6488
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dc.contributor.supervisorNijhawan, Parag-
dc.contributor.supervisorDileep, Shadakshari-
dc.contributor.authorBhardwaj, Anu-
dc.date.accessioned2023-06-27T10:06:31Z-
dc.date.available2023-06-27T10:06:31Z-
dc.date.issued2023-06-27-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10266/6488-
dc.description.abstractThis project report is based on my internship at Bosch Global Software Technologies where I gained great experience. Electric vehicles are gaining worldwide recognition for their improved performance and low carbon emissions. The efficiency of electric vehicles depends on the integration of energy storage and energy conversion. However, energy storage systems generally have the characteristics of low energy consumption, unregulated and highly reactive. To solve these problems, EV converters, controllers and modulation schemes are essential to ensure safe and reliable power transfer from the energy store to the generator. However, these converters and controllers have some disadvantages such as large output, high current voltage, high switching frequency, slow response time and simplicity. One of the main factors hindering more electricity usage is fear of rising electricity costs due to home payments, power quality issues and battery life. Electric power converter is the main function of electric power and battery of electric car. Therefore, the cost of new and reliable electricity is changing rapidly, especially for advanced EV charging systems. The rapid development of power conversion topologies offers significant opportunities in electric vehicle charging. This report provides a comprehensive review of DC-DC converter topologies for battery management and includes simulation models for better understanding and analysis.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectElectric Vehicleen_US
dc.subjectDC-DC converteren_US
dc.subjectVehicle-to-Griden_US
dc.subjectInverteren_US
dc.subjectHarmonicsen_US
dc.titleFeasibility Study of Vehicle-To-Grid Systemen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
Appears in Collections:Masters Theses@EIED

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